Mohammed Jabbateh

Age, Biography and Wiki

Mohammed Jabbateh was born on 1966. Discover Mohammed Jabbateh’s Biography, Age, Height, Physical Stats, Dating/Affairs, Family and career updates. Learn How rich is He in this year and how He spends money? Also learn how He earned most of networth at the age of 54 years old?

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Age54 years old
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Mohammed Jabbateh Height, Weight & Measurements

At 54 years old, Mohammed Jabbateh height not available right now. We will update Mohammed Jabbateh’s Height, weight, Body Measurements, Eye Color, Hair Color, Shoe & Dress size soon as possible.

Physical Status
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Dating & Relationship status

He is currently single. He is not dating anyone. We don’t have much information about He’s past relationship and any previous engaged. According to our Database, He has no children.

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Mohammed Jabbateh Net Worth

He net worth has been growing significantly in 2018-19. So, how much is Mohammed Jabbateh worth at the age of 54 years old? Mohammed Jabbateh’s income source is mostly from being a successful . He is from . We have estimated Mohammed Jabbateh’s net worth, money, salary, income, and assets.

Net Worth in 2020$1 Million – $5 Million
Salary in 2019Under Review
Net Worth in 2019Pending
Salary in 2019Under Review
HouseNot Available
CarsNot Available
Source of Income

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Timeline of Mohammed Jabbateh

2018

On October 18, Jabbateh was convicted with two counts of fraud in immigration documents and two counts of perjury stemming from statements he made in connection with his applications for asylum and for legal permanent residence in the US. He was held guilty on all four charges. Jabbateh was sentenced to 30 years in prison on April 19, 2018.

2017

Mohammed Jabbateh, nom de guerre “Jungle Jabbah” is a Liberian native (born 1966) who stood trial in a US court beginning on October 2, 2017 for lying to United States (US) authorities when he sought asylum in the late 1990s about his role in the First Liberian Civil War (1989-1997), a conflict that killed about 250,000 people and was followed the break out Second Liberian Civil War (1999-2003) . On October 18, 2017, Jabbateh was charged in a Philadelphia federal courthouse with two counts of fraud in immigration documents and two counts of perjury stemming from statements he made to US authorities when filing for asylum and permanent residence. He is the first person convicted of crimes stemming from his war-related activities during the First Liberian Civil War.

On October 2, 2017, Jabbateh was arraigned before the Honorable Judge Paul S. Diamond at the James A. Byrne Federal Courthouse in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US. The jury, composed of eight women and four men, was selected on October 2, 2017 and opening arguments began the following day on October 3, 2017. The trial lasted for three weeks until October 18, 2017. Assistant United States Attorney Linwood C. Wright, Jr. and Assistant United States Attorney Nelson S.T. Thayer prosecuted Mohammed Jabbateh. Thayer was previously a Trial Attorney at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and prosecuted the massacre in Srebrenica, Bosnia.

Gregory J. Pagano was the Attorney for Mohammed Jabbateh. Pagano interrogated the credibility of the government’s selection of the witnesses and their testimonies. The defense counsel presented their case on October 16, 2017.

2016

On March 10, 2016, Jabbateh was indicted and charged by the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania with two counts of fraud in immigration documents in violation of the 18 U.S.C. § 1546 and two counts of perjury in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1621. Jabbateh pleaded “not guilty” on all counts.

The indictment was unsealed on April 13, 2016 and Jabbateh was arrested in his Delaware County home in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania.

1999

Jabbateh disclosed that he was a member of ULIMO and later ULIMO-K (Mandingo ethnic faction), but he did not reveal his alleged capacity. In January 1999, an immigration asylum officer interviewed Jabbateh to determine whether his asylum application should be granted. Jabbateh falsely responded “no” to these two questions: 1. “[H]ave you ever committed a crime?” and 2. [H]ave you ever harmed anyone else?” In January 1999, Jabbateh received US asylum based on his answers to questions posed on his Form I-589 asylum application form.

Jabbateh was granted US political asylum on December 23, 1999. He settled in Lansdowne, the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, Delaware County, US where he remained until his conviction in October 2017. Jabbateh has a wife and five children who live in Philadelphia. Jabbateh also has an ex-wife and at least seven children who live in his native Liberia or otherwise on the African continent, whom he attempted to sponsor to immigrate to the US. A few years after Jabbateh received legal residency he started a shipping company in 2008, Jabateh Brothers Loading Services that packages and ships containers to Liberia. It remains in operation.

1998

In December 1998, Mohammed Jabbateh submitted his application for US asylum and later for permanent legal residency. At that time the US Attorney claimed that Jabbateh was not truthful about his activities during Liberia’s civil war.

Jabbateh is known in his near-Philadelphia community as a righteous man. He does not hold a US passport and has not left the country since his arrival in 1998.

1990

The government proved that as a ULIMO-K commander in the late 1990s, Jabbateh either committed himself or ordered his troops to “commit crimes such as the murder of civilians, sexual enslavement of women, public rapes, conscription of child soldiers and maiming and torture of noncombatants.”