Tim Hardaway

Age, Biography, and Wiki

Tim Hardaway is an American basketball player who was born on September 1, 1966, in Chicago, Illinois. Tim Hardaway’s biography, age, height, weight, physical stats, dating/affairs, health, and career updates are all available here. Find out how wealthy He is this year and how He spends his income. Also, check out how he amassed the bulk of his net worth at the age of 54.

Popular AsN/A
Occupation
American basketball player
Age54 years old
Zodiac SignVirgo
Born1 September 1966
Birthday1 September
BirthplaceChicago, Illinois, United States
NationalityAmerican

We recommend you to check the complete list of Famous People born on 1 September.
He is a member of the famous Player with the age 54 years old group.

Tim Hardaway Height, Weight & Measurements

Tim Hardaway’s height is actually inaccessible at 54 years old. Tim Hardaway’s height, weight, body proportions, eye color, hair color, shoe style, and dress size will be revised as soon as possible.

Physical Status
HeightNot Available
WeightNot Available
Body MeasurementsNot Available
Eye ColorNot Available
Hair ColorNot Available

Who Is Tim Hardaway’s Wife?

His wife is Yolanda Adkins Hardaway (m. 1993)

Family
ParentsNot Available
WifeYolanda Adkins Hardaway (m. 1993)
SiblingNot Available
ChildrenTim Hardaway Jr., Nia Hardaway

Tim Hardaway Net Worth

In 2018-19, he has seen a major rise in his net worth. So, at the age of 54, how much is Tim Hardaway worth? Tim Hardaway earns the bulk of his money as a successful player. He is an American citizen. Tim Hardaway’s net worth, capital, wages, profits, and assets have all been measured.

Net Worth in 2020$1 Million – $5 Million
Salary in 2019Under Review
Net Worth in 2019Pending
Salary in 2019Under Review
HouseNot Available
CarsNot Available
Source of IncomePlayer

Tim Hardaway Social Network

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WikipediaTim Hardaway Wikipedia
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Trivia of  Tim Hardaway

  • Tim Hardaway is an American basketball player who was born on September 1, 1966, in Chicago, Illinois.
  • Tim Hardaway’s biography, age, height, weight, physical stats, dating/affairs, health, and career updates are all available here.
  • Find out how wealthy He is this year and how He spends his income.
  • Also, check out how he amassed the bulk of his net worth at the age of 54. Tim Hardaway’s height is actually inaccessible at 54 years old.
  • Tim Hardaway’s height, weight, body proportions, eye color, hair color, shoe style, and dress size will be revised as soon as possible.In 2018-19, he has seen a major rise in his net worth.
  • So, at the age of 54, how much is Tim Hardaway worth?
  • Tim Hardaway earns the bulk of his money as a successful player.
  • He is an American citizen.
  • Tim Hardaway’s net worth, capital, wages, profits, and assets have all been measured.

Timeline of Tim Hardaway

2014

On August 7, 2014, it was announced that Hardaway was named an assistant coach for the Detroit Pistons.

2013

In April 2013, when Jason Collins came out as the first active openly gay male player in a major American professional team sport, Collins said that Hardaway called him in support of his homosexuality. In July 2013, Hardaway was the symbolic first signer of a petition to put a proposed amendment to the Florida State Constitution overturning Florida Amendment 2 and allowing same-sex marriage in his home state of Florida on the ballot in 2014.

He and his wife Yolanda reside in Miami, Florida. They have a son, Tim Jr., and a daughter, Nina. His son, Tim Jr., was drafted by the New York Knicks in 2013.

2010

Hardaway was the 1989 WAC Player of the Year. He recorded 5,000 points and 2,500 assists, second fastest in NBA history after Oscar Robertson. Hardaway accomplished it in 262 games; Robertson took only 247. He held the record for most assists in Miami Heat franchise history with 1,947, until his total was surpassed by Dwyane Wade on January 16, 2010.

In an interview on February 11, 2010, on Hardcore Sports Radio on Sirius, Hardaway spoke about his recent work with The Trevor Project and The YES Institute, which he has done to educate himself on LGBT issues.

2009

In September 2009, he played for the NBA Generations team in the 2009 NBA Asia Challenge, a series of exhibitions against Korean Basketball League and Philippine Basketball Association players.

2007

During a February 14, 2007, interview on Miami’s The Dan Le Batard Show, in response to the coming out of former NBA player John Amaechi, Hardaway remarked that he would try to distance himself from a player he knew was homosexual. When asked by the radio show host whether he realized that his remarks were homophobic, Hardaway responded by saying: “Well, you know I hate gay people, so I let it be known. I don’t like gay people and I don’t like to be around gay people. I am homophobic. I don’t like it. It shouldn’t be in the world or in the United States.” He also said that if he found out he had one or more gay teammates, he would try to get them fired.

In a September 2007 interview, Hardaway spoke about his February comments, saying he “had no idea how much I hurt people. A lot of people.” He described the controversy as “the biggest bump [in the road] in my life”, and added, “I’m going to do whatever I can to correct it. That’s all I can do.”

2006

Hardaway was a player/head coach of the Florida Pit Bulls of the ABA in 2006.

2003

On March 27, 2003, Hardaway signed a contract with the Indiana Pacers, and in his first game registered a season-high 14 points and seven assists against the Chicago Bulls. By the end of his career, Hardaway competed in five NBA All-Star Games.

2001

Following the 2000–01 season, and with his skills declining with age, Hardaway was traded to the Dallas Mavericks on August 22, 2001, for a second-round draft pick. He was at one time Miami’s all-time leader in assists. With Dallas, Hardaway was mainly utilized off the bench, starting only two games out of 54 and averaging almost ten points a game. In the middle of the season, he was traded to the Denver Nuggets in exchange for point guard Nick Van Exel.

2000

That summer, Hardaway and Mourning won a gold medal playing for the U.S.A. men’s basketball team at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia. Before the 2000–01 season Mourning would be diagnosed with a rare kidney disease, and would be sidelined for much of the season. Hardaway upped his offensive production to 14.9 points a game with 6.3 assists a game as Miami won 50 games and captured the East’s third best record, only to be swept in the first round by the Charlotte Hornets.

In 2000, he played in the Sydney Olympics, scoring 5.5 points/Game and shooting .385 (15-39) from the field.

1999

Hardaway’s production slipped in the 1999–2000 season, with Alonzo Mourning and Jamal Mashburn carrying more of the offensive load. Hardaway averaged 13.4 points with 7.4 assists a game, but shot a personal best .367 percent from beyond the three-point arc. After playing just 52 games, Hardaway was further limited in the playoffs, as Miami defeated the Detroit Pistons but once again fell to New York in 7 games.

1998

He was also selected (as one of the last two players selected) for the 1998 FIBA World Championship team. The team was later replaced with CBA and college players due to the NBA lockout.

1997

Hardaway started in 81 games, averaging 20.3 points, 8.6 assists, while placing fourth in the league with 203 three-point baskets. He also played in the 1997 NBA All-Star Game, scoring 10 points in 14 minutes. In the playoffs, Hardaway averaged 26 points a game as the Heat defeated the Orlando Magic in the first round in 5 games, and then defeated the New York Knicks in 7 games in the semifinals, in which Hardaway scored 38 points in the 7th game. Miami would once again fall to the defending champion Chicago Bulls in the Eastern Conference Finals in 5 games.

In the 1997–98 season, Hardaway averaged 18.9 points and 8.3 assist per game, and was selected to play in the 1998 NBA All-Star Game. The Heat won 55 games and won the Atlantic Division, but lost to the Knicks in 5 games in the first round of the playoffs. In the lockout shortened 1998–99 season, he averaged 17.4 points a game with 7.3 assists, and Miami won the Atlantic Division again but could once again not defeat the Knicks in the first round of the playoffs despite having home court advantage and the Knicks being the 8th seed in the playoffs.

1994

Hardaway was originally selected to play for “Dream Team II” in the 1994 FIBA World Championship but was replaced after suffering a torn knee ligament.

1993

As a Warrior, Hardaway made the NBA All-Star Game three straight years, and a knee injury kept him out of the entire 1993–94 season. He reached 5,000 points and 2,500 assists faster than any other NBA player except Oscar Robertson. Hardaway played for the Warriors until the middle of 1995–96 season when he was traded to the Miami Heat along with Chris Gatling in exchange for Kevin Willis and Bimbo Coles.

1991

Hardaway averaged a career-high 23.4 points a game in the 1991–92 season, as the Warriors fell in the first round of the playoffs to the Seattle SuperSonics. The following season Hardaway averaged a career-high 10.6 assists a game to get with his scoring average of 21.5, but the Warriors did not make the playoffs and would not return to postseason action for the remainder of Hardaway’s tenure with the team.

Hardaway shares the record for second most steals in an NBA Playoffs game, with 8 in Game 2 of the 1991 Western Conference Semifinals against the Los Angeles Lakers and in Game 4 of the 1992 Western Conference First Round against the Seattle SuperSonics. In 1991–92, Hardaway became the 7th player in NBA history to average 20 points (23.4 ppg) and 10 assists (10.0 apg) in a season, a feat he accomplished again in 1992–93 (21.5 ppg, 10.6 apg).

Hardaway holds the NBA record for the worst single-game shooting performance in NBA history, going 0-for-17 in a 106–102 win against the Minnesota Timberwolves on December 27, 1991. Hardaway holds the Miami Heat’s all-time record in 3-point field goals made, with 806. His number 10 was retired by the Miami Heat on October 28, 2009.

1990

Golden State made the playoffs during the 1990–91 season, Hardaway’s second season and his first season in the playoffs. In the first round, the 7th seeded Warriors defeated the 2nd seeded San Antonio Spurs led by All-Star David Robinson in 4 games to advance to face the 3rd seeded Los Angeles Lakers led by NBA legend Magic Johnson. The Warriors managed to steal a game on the road in game 2, but could not defeat the more experienced Lakers, falling in five games despite Hardaway averaging 26.8 points, 12.8 assists and 3.8 steals for the series.

1987

He was twice named MVP of El Paso’s Sun Bowl Invitational Tournament, in 1987 and 1988. He played on teams that went to the NCAA Tournaments in 1988 and 1989. At UTEP he won the Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award as the best college player in the nation six feet (1.83 m) tall or under. He was selected as the 14th pick of the first round, in the 1989 NBA draft by the Golden State Warriors.

1966

Timothy Duane Hardaway Sr. (born September 1, 1966) is an American retired basketball player. At 6 ft (1.83 m) tall, he was best known for his crossover dribble which was dubbed the “UTEP Two-step” by television analysts.

1928

Following the mid-season trade to Miami, Hardaway started 28 games to finish the season, averaging 17.2 points a game with 10 assists. Miami made the playoffs but were swept in the first round by the 72 win Chicago Bulls. The following season was a huge success for Miami and for Hardaway, as he finished 4th in voting for the NBA Most Valuable Player Award, was selected to the All-NBA First Team as Miami won a franchise record 61 wins.